The Wet Nose Press Pet Blog

2

May 27, 2016
by Lynn Merton
0 comments

A Clean and Green Home For Your Pet

Image Credit – Wikimedia.org/

Pets are exposed to a number of toxic environments in their lifetime. However, the place you think is the safest is often the one that is most dangerous to the health of your pet. The modern home has more gases, chemicals and natural toxins than any other place your pet is likely to come across in the neighborhood. In spite of that, most pet owners are blissfully unaware of the health hazard posed by innocuous products like furniture polishes and air fresheners.

Just like humans, animals also fall ill due to physical reactions to most of the chemicals which are used to manufacture textiles and furniture in the home, and also cleaning products which leave residual films. On the other hand, air fresheners can irritate the mucus membranes and breathing passages – particularly in brachycephalic breeds. Damp carpets can also pose a health risk to your pet, considering the fact that they are so close to the source. To top it all, a lot of the plants that are used to keep the air clean in your house can be toxic to your pet as well. Luckily, there are things you can do to make sure that your pet stays protected from chemical overload.

Keep a tab on the chemicals

You need to exercise a lot of care with volatile organic compounds. They are carbon based chemicals and tend to evaporate at room temperature. Most of them stay around in the air for a long time especially if the ventilation is poor. These are often found in furniture manufactured out of composite wood products, disinfecting solutions (citrus-scented or pine-lemon cleaners and bleach). Prolonged exposure to these products can cause cancer, kidney or liver damage, and affect the central nervous system. Short term exposure can lead to vomiting, dizziness, breathing problems and irritate the mucus membranes in the eyes, nose and mouth.

New carpeting also has a lot of chemicals associated with their manufacture and installation. Along with benzene, formaldehyde and acetone, carpets are usually treated with moth proofing, stain protectors and fire retardants. Finally, they are attached to the floor with the help of volatile adhesives. So, if you are planning to buy a new carpet, make sure that the carpet is “gassed off” before the installation. If it is possible, use staples to install them instead of adhesives and make sure that the room is well-aired for the brief period after the installation.

When it comes to new furniture, manufacturers use a lot of chemicals to protect the fabric, wood and all the other components. Make sure that you air out the new pieces before you let your pet stretch out on them. That will drastically lower the risk of an adverse chemical reaction.

1

May 26, 2016
by Lynn Merton
3 Comments

Why Do Dogs Get Along With Some Pets And Hate Some Other Pets

Image courtesy: Pixabay.com/

It may be odd for pet owners to see their pets make split-second judgments on other pets, and decide to love or hate them. However, that’s only because you aren’t seeing things from your dog’s point of view. We take a look at what is the train of thought that goes behind these doggy judgments.

Why does your pet hate some dogs?

Dogs make judgments on other pets based on their body language and scent, among other factors. The display of dominant or aggressive posture may cause your pet to hate other pets. Your dog may instantly take to some dogs, after smelling a whiff of treats on them, while he may hate him if he has a peculiar scent. Alphas in canines usually get along better with pets of the opposite gender, due to dominance issues. It is also not unusual for dogs to get along well with dogs of the same breed.

Your dog may hate another dog if it reminds him of a dog that had previously attacked him. In fact, a dog attacked by another canine from a certain breed, may take to hating other dogs of the same breed after the episode. Sometimes, dogs may start growling when they see a bigger dog, if they are scared for themselves or their owners. Your dog may take an aggressive stance around other dogs because he is being possessive or defensive.

Should you do something about it?

Your dog’s hate of other pets should not be a cause of concern in most cases, especially if your dog runs into the other dog only occasionally. However, if your dog has to live in close quarters or interact with the other dog regularly then you want to look into obedience training and monitored interactions to prevent fights and aggression.

You can start by helping your dog associate the presence of the other pet with positive incidents, such as receiving treats. Give your dog a treat every time he sees the other pet; soon he will look forward to seeing the other pet, as it means that treats will manifest soon. If your dog behaves aggressively toward the other dog due to behavioral issues, then you want to take him to an expert. There are also socialization classes for pets that help them interact with other pets in a structured environment.

Once you are sure that your pet’s socialization and behavioral issues have been resolved, you can consider introducing him to the other pet in a closely monitored setting for a short period of time. You may not be able to get them to get along extremely well, but so long as they are able to co-exist in peace, it should not be a problem.

2

May 25, 2016
by Lynn Merton
1 Comment

How To Keep your Pet Dandruff-Free

Image Credit – Flickr.com/

Dandruff is definitely not on the top of the list of the most aesthetically pleasing things in the world. They are also a sign that your pet has dry skin. Read on to find the best ways to deal with dandruff problems. After all, your pet is named Fluffy and not Flaky.

  1. Regular grooming – If you brush your pet’s hair on a daily basis, not only will he feel good, it will also help keep his fur shiny, smooth and burr free. It also helps in distributing the natural oils in the coat and massages the skin. The brush you choose is going to make a lot of difference. If it is very soft, it is not going to be of any help. If it is too stiff, it will just end up aggravating the condition. Remember the story of Goldilocks – you want a brush that is just right!
  2. Spritz away – Make sure you do not grab the first product you see on the shelf. Get special pet oils which are usually available in spray bottles at holistic pet shops and spas. They are formulated to soothe the dry skin and lock in all the moisture. Your pet will get a break from all the pesky dandruff and also get pampered salon style.
  3. Splish and splash – Make sure you give regular baths to your pet. When dealing with dog or cat dandruff issues, there is nothing as useful as regular bathing to keep all the dandruff at bay. There are plenty of moisturizing, organic pet shampoos and conditioners. You also have products that are specifically designed for tricky dandruff issues.
  4. Moisture plus – If you have a high quality, completely natural hand cream (especially one with colloidal oatmeal), you can go ahead and uses it on your pet. It can work wonders on dry skin. Apply some of it to your hands and massage it deeply into your pet’s fur. Make sure you get it against the skin. Your pet will also like it. After all, everyone enjoys a good massage every now and then.
  5. Dandruff shampoo – You have specially designed anti-dandruff shampoo for pets. If the problem has gotten beyond control, add some of it to the regular bath of your pet to help him deal with the problem.
  6. Diet – Pets need a considerable amount of good fat in their diet to keep their skin supple and their fur shiny. You can switch their diet to a holistic, high quality pet food. You can also supplement their regular diet with oils which are designed specifically for pets.

Now that you can utilize these handy tips, your pet will soon be on his way to a dandruff-free existence.

2

May 24, 2016
by Lynn Merton
1 Comment

Four Ways in Which You Can Unwittingly Break the Spirit of Your Dog

Image Credit – Wikimedia.org/

None of us like to be told off day in and day out. Our spirits sink and we feel discouraged from ever doing anything. We all know that dogs also feel sorrow, get depressed and feel threatened by their most common predator – man. Here are a few things that pet owners do on a daily basis that destroys the spirit of their spirited pup:

  1. Yell/scold/rub his nose in waste – One of the biggest myths is that dogs know whenever we get mad at them for pooping or peeing inside the house. Coming across a puddle of piss in the middle of your living room might not be pleasant for you, but you need to understand that your dog does not feel any guilt when you disapprove. As a matter of fact, they react fearfully to their owner’s emotional response, irrespective of when the incident occurred. Yelling or screaming just reinforces bullying and since it happens long after the incident, your dog will just be afraid and confused. Most importantly, never rub their nose in pee or poo as it reflects a disgusting mentality and is plain mean.
  2. Hitting your dog – We are well past the days of dominance and submission. Hitting your dog is an outdated training method. All it does is teach your dog that he needs to be afraid of you. If you really want to hit something, use the punching bag at your local gym or go for an anger management course. Don’t bring a dog into your house. They don’t deserve such treatment.
  3. Kennel time out – If a pup is being uncooperative and not behaving the way you desire while you are training him, that does not mean that he is defiant or spiteful. It just means that he is a puppy. You need to modify your behavior first. Stop for a minute and think about your method of training. There are good chances that your pup is distracted or not developmentally ready for the task. This applies to adult dogs too. If they do something that you disapprove of, don’t punish them or banish them to the kennel.
  4. Taking their food away while they are eating – This is just plain ridiculous and it just goes to show your dog that you are a grand bully. Although having a pack leader is important, dogs must be left to their own devices when they are eating. If a dog is loving, kind and welcoming of strangers when he is not eating, there is no reason to believe that their aggressive behavior around their food is anything out of the ordinary. A lot of people tend to view a growling dog as a greedy one, but it is important to understand that this is just a dog being a dog.
2

May 23, 2016
by Lynn Merton
1 Comment

A Clean and Green Home For Your Pet

Image Credit – Wikimedia.org/

Pets are exposed to a number of toxic environments in their lifetime. However, the place you think is the safest is often the one that is most dangerous to the health of your pet. The modern home has more gases, chemicals and natural toxins than any other place your pet is likely to come across in the neighborhood. In spite of that, most pet owners are blissfully unaware of the health hazard posed by innocuous products like furniture polishes and air fresheners.

Just like humans, animals also fall ill due to physical reactions to most of the chemicals which are used to manufacture textiles and furniture in the home, and also cleaning products which leave residual films. On the other hand, air fresheners can irritate the mucus membranes and breathing passages – particularly in brachycephalic breeds. Damp carpets can also pose a health risk to your pet, considering the fact that they are so close to the source. To top it all, a lot of the plants that are used to keep the air clean in your house can be toxic to your pet as well. Luckily, there are things you can do to make sure that your pet stays protected from chemical overload.

Keep a tab on the chemicals

You need to exercise a lot of care with volatile organic compounds. They are carbon based chemicals and tend to evaporate at room temperature. Most of them stay around in the air for a long time especially if the ventilation is poor. These are often found in furniture manufactured out of composite wood products, disinfecting solutions (citrus-scented or pine-lemon cleaners and bleach). Prolonged exposure to these products can cause cancer, kidney or liver damage, and affect the central nervous system. Short term exposure can lead to vomiting, dizziness, breathing problems and irritate the mucus membranes in the eyes, nose and mouth.

New carpeting also has a lot of chemicals associated with their manufacture and installation. Along with benzene, formaldehyde and acetone, carpets are usually treated with moth proofing, stain protectors and fire retardants. Finally, they are attached to the floor with the help of volatile adhesives. So, if you are planning to buy a new carpet, make sure that the carpet is “gassed off” before the installation. If it is possible, use staples to install them instead of adhesives and make sure that the room is well-aired for the brief period after the installation.

When it comes to new furniture, manufacturers use a lot of chemicals to protect the fabric, wood and all the other components. Make sure that you air out the new pieces before you let your pet stretch out on them. That will drastically lower the risk of an adverse chemical reaction.