Runaway Beagle Found; Shelter Refuses to Return Dog to Family

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Photo from NBC10

As of last Wednesday, a Pennsylvania family has been in a contentious battle with local animal shelter, trying to win back custody of their beloved Beagle.

The Story

Rob and Alexis Krekstein were having work done on their house, with contractors constantly coming in and out. At some point on Tuesday, the door was left ajar, and the Krekstein’s Beagle, aptly named Flash, saw the opportunity and ran out on his own.

After their dog bolted out the front door, the Krekstein family quickly snapped into action. While they canvassed the surrounding area, called the police, and notified the SPCA, their efforts were not rewarded, as nobody was able to give them any information about their lost pup’s whereabouts.

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Alexis and Flash

When news that Flash was found finally came, it wasn’t from the cops, a neighbor, or the SPCA — it was the Main Line Animal Rescue, the place where the Krekstein’s adopted their baby Flash. However, what they expected to be a stress relieving message ended up becoming one of the most tension-inducing emails they would ever receive.

The Conflict

In the email, the executive director of the shelter, Bill Smith, told the Kreksteins that the family was found in breach of their contract with the shelter. Since the shelter was not notified of Flash’s escape, and the fact that Flash was found without ID tags,  Smith stated that the terms of their contract were broken, thereby absolving it and relinquishing ownership of the dog back to the shelter.

RELATED STORY: How to Adopt a Dog or Cat: Every Question Answered

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Main Line Animal Rescue

“It’s infuriating. It’s a member of my family. You treat a dog like a child,” said Rob Krekstein. “I didn’t rent the dog. The dog lives in my home.”

Flash was brought back to the shelter after it was discovered that he was microchipped. “I thought I was doing the smartest thing by getting the information out around here where he would be found. It never occurred to me the chip would show up Main Line Animal Rescue and they would not return the dog back to me,” said Alex Krekstein.

RELATED STORY: Pet Microchips 101

Smith claims that the Kreksteins were well aware of what they signed up for with the contract, and knowingly disregarded it. The Kreksteins, on the other hand, say that they don’t consider Flash “a contract.”

What do you think? Should Flash be returned to the Kreksteins, or do you agree with the Main Line Animal Rescue’s stance on how to care for a dog? Tell us in the comments!

Source: NBC Philadelphia