The Wet Nose Press Pet Blog

December 7, 2018
by Lynn Merton
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Steps you can take to protect your dog from being stolen

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Losing your dog is one of the hardest things to experience in life. Your priceless companion getting kidnapped can be so stressful and heartbreaking. A lot of dogs are stolen with an ulterior motive. Purebred dogs are usually sold to pet stores, puppy mills, or breeders, where they get a good sum of money. Dog fighting is also another reason why people kidnap smaller dogs as they can be used as bait. Some dogs are captured for their fur even.

You can help keep your dog safe and from theft by following some of these tips.

  1. Consider putting a microchip
    Microchipping can help you find your lost dog. It can also be a part of a police investigation. People can remove your dog’s collar, but microchips cannot be removed without surgery. Ensure that you keep your contact details up-to-date.
  2. Do not leave your dog tied up and unattended.
    There are many instances where dogs are taken from their yards. Do not leave your dog unattended, even if you are home. It makes them vulnerable to anyone who is passing by and could be an opportunist.
  3. Be aware of strangers who seem too interested in your dog
    It is heart-warming to talk about our dogs, most of us love sharing details about our dogs. You should not share any detailed information about your dog’s breeding, cost, or least of all where you live. It gives the stranger too much of an opportunity.
  4. Leaving your dog locked in the car is a big no-no.
    It is common to believe that your dog is perfectly safe in your locked car while you run to finish some errands. It puts your dog at risk of getting napped as someone can easily break in and snatch your dog. You also run the risk of someone trying to steal other valuables in your car and then allowing your dog to escape.
  5. Lock your gate and make sure your yard is secured.
    Fit a bell to the gate so that you hear it if anyone opens it while your dog is playing outside. You can also keep your yard gates locked with a big paddock and build fences that are high enough that prevents someone from reaching over and picking up your dog.
  6. Keep your dog on a leash
    Your dog could get excited and run away if you walk your dog off-leash, when this happens, they could quickly be picked up by someone. Off-leash dogs are more likely to be a target for thieves. It’s more difficult to steal a dog that’s physically attached to you through a leash.
  7. Get an ID tag for your dog.
    If your dog wears a collar and ID tag with your name and address on it, people could contact you if he/she gets lost. A mobile number is also a good idea, but do not put your dog’s name on the ID.

December 6, 2018
by Lynn Merton
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5 signs you need to change your pet’s food

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Just like human beings, pets need a change in their food and diet. You can’t expect them to eat the same pet food their entire lives. Your pet’s dietary needs can and will change over time due to factors like their age, their overall health, and their activity level. Here are some of the signs that let you know that you need to change your pet’s food.

  1. Your dog’s coat starts looking dull.
    Pet food that is rich in essential fatty acids ensures that your a pet’s skin remains healthy, and results in a shiny and healthy coat. Most pet foods are specially made to improve your pet’s skin and coat. Pet food that contains both Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids are known to make your pet’s coat shiny and bright in no time.
  2. Your pet has diarrhea
    Chronic diarrhoea and regurgitation are not good signs. It is one of the most evident sign that your pet’s food is not appropriate. Having a case of loose stools can affect your dog’s health negatively. It is also a sign that your pet hasn’t digested the food properly.
  3. Your pet is becoming increasingly lazy.
    Your pet might suffer from malnutrition or the lack of enough nutrition because of the low-quality pet food or if your pet has recently gone through a stressful event, illness, or surgery. Pet food that has high levels of antioxidants can help boost the immune response to accelerate your pet’s recovery and get them back on their feet in no time. Before you change your pet’s diet in this case, consult a vet as well.
  4. Your pet is growing older and going through the Senioritis phase.
    Pets are usually considered middle-aged to senior around 5-7 years. Senior diets, for example, are lower in calories but higher in fibre, and often have supplements that are specific to this life stage such as joint support and antioxidants. Look for pet food labelled for “adult maintenance.”
  5. You find your pet itching very often.
    Like humans, pets can suffer from allergies, and food allergy is just one of several possible causes. Itching manifests as dry and itching skin. You can consult with your veterinarian, who can recommend either a prescription diet or an over the counter sensitive skin diet, depending on your pet’s individual needs.
  6. You find your pet itching very often.
    Like humans, pets can suffer from allergies, and food allergy is just one of several possible causes. Itching manifests as dry and itching skin. Pets who are allergic to certain food may benefit from a low-allergen diet. You can consult with your veterinarian, who can recommend either a prescription diet or an over the counter sensitive skin diet, depending on your pet’s individual needs.

Check for these signs and consult with your vet to make sure that your pet receives the right food.

December 6, 2018
by Lynn Merton
0 comments

How to tell if your cat is down with fever

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A cat can’t tell you when he/she is down with fever. You have to figure out when they are feeling under weather. Cats are as prone to fever as their human parents. However, a touch of their forehead is not going to reveal if they’re running a temperature. You have to use a thermometer and insert it into their rectum or ear. Obviously, your cats will not be pleased with being held against their will. So, it’s a good idea to look out for some warning signs that can indicate your cat has a fever before putting him/her through that.

Symptoms that your cat has a fever

Just like humans, cats exhibit a lack of appetite, shivering, lethargy, dehydration and warm ears when they are experiencing fever. Other symptoms are depression and a fall in their grooming habits. They may also sneeze, vomit or report diarrhea. The following are some warning signs you should keep an eye out for, which will help diagnose your cat’s fever –

  • Changes in behavior – If a generally playful cat begins to behave reclusive and hide itself away in odd places, you should worry. Cats are cautious and like to reduce their vulnerability by hiding away from you when ill.
  • Monitor your cat’s appetite – Your cat may not be eating well if its down with fever. If its feeling unsafe, it won’t come out to eat at its regular place. You can try coaxing it out or placing their feeding bowl near their safe place. If they still refuse to eat, change up their regular meal plan and introduce something exciting that they’d be more likely to consume.
  • Vomiting or diarrhea – Commonplace and serious cat illnesses cause fever. Additional symptoms like vomiting and diarrhea may also be present. If your cat is nifty, he/she may try to bury any signs of this. Check the area of their litter box. If you pet an outdoor cat, follow it outside to its resting area to search out any tell-tale signs.
  • Laziness – Now, cats are notoriously lazy creatures. But if your cat has been acting extra lethargic lately, you should consider taking him/her to a vet for a checkup. It is unusual for a cat who normally follows you around to not pay attention to you or treats that you may be dangling infront of him/her to get their attention.

If any of the above signs are present in your cat, you can proceed to check their body temperature with a thermometer. Lubricate this thermometer beforehand to make the process as comfortable as possible for your kitty. If the temperature reads above 103 degrees, rush your cat to a vet. They have a fever.

December 6, 2018
by Lynn Merton
0 comments

Everything you need to know about UTI in cats

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Cat parents may be surprised to know that many health conditions that we suffer can be experienced by cats too. Anxiety disorders, hip dysplasia, UTIs – you name it. What makes this worse is that pets cannot vocalize their pain. It is important to monitor their behavior for signs that they may be suffering from an urinary or bladder problem.

What is an UTI?

An UTI or Urinary Tract Infection is an infection that affects the urethra, urinary system or bladder. It can also spread to damage vital organs like kidneys. It may also lead to cell damage due to bacterial invasion.

Symptoms of Cat UTI

These are the primary signs that may indicate that your cat be suffering from an UTI –

  • Having difficulty passing urine
  • Crying out in pain while urinating
  • Blood in the urine
  • Frequent urination
  • Urinating in odd locations and not in their litter box
  • Blockage in the urethra or urine flow
  • Licking genitalia
  • Stronger than usual urine odor
  • A thick, hard and contracted bladder wall which the vet can feel during a physical

Even if the results come back negative for an UTI infection, there is still possibly reason to worry.

Causes of UTI in cats

When a bacteria moves up the urethra and into the bladder, it grows and multiplies there resulting in an UTI. Cats usually experience urinary tract disorders more often than urinary tract infections.

How does a vet diagnose UTI in cats?

A vet runs an urinalysis to diagnose a positive or negative UTI. An urinalysis is an in-depth examination of the properties of urine and is significant for determining the presence of any bacterial infection. E.coli is the most common culprit behind UTIs but not the only one which can be held responsible for the infection. The vet needs to identify the agent of the disease properly in order to treat it effectively. A blood count may also be asked for, to check if the symptoms displayed can be a result of more serious health complications.

Treatment

Antibiotics are prescribed by vets in order to treat the infection. Follow up appointments are usually advised to ensure that the infection has been taken care of and won’t risk other parts of the body.

Conclusion

Older female cats and diabetic cats stand a high risk of developing UTIs. Cats which have bladder stones are also at risk of developing UTIs. Take your cat for regular vet visits and perform urine tests on them from time to time to prevent your cat from contracting an UTI. Maintain his/her cleanliness and hygiene and you shouldn’t have to worry about your cat coming down with an UTI.

December 5, 2018
by Lynn Merton
0 comments

How to tell if your cat is down with fever

Image Source: Pixabay.com

A cat can’t tell you when he/she is down with fever. You have to figure out when they are feeling under weather. Cats are as prone to fever as their human parents. However, a touch of their forehead is not going to reveal if they’re running a temperature. You have to use a thermometer and insert it into their rectum or ear. Obviously, your cats will not be pleased with being held against their will. So, it’s a good idea to look out for some warning signs that can indicate your cat has a fever before putting him/her through that.

Symptoms that your cat has a fever

Just like humans, cats exhibit a lack of appetite, shivering, lethargy, dehydration and warm ears when they are experiencing fever. Other symptoms are depression and a fall in their grooming habits. They may also sneeze, vomit or report diarrhea. The following are some warning signs you should keep an eye out for, which will help diagnose your cat’s fever –

  • Changes in behavior – If a generally playful cat begins to behave reclusive and hide itself away in odd places, you should worry. Cats are cautious and like to reduce their vulnerability by hiding away from you when ill.
  • Monitor your cat’s appetite – Your cat may not be eating well if its down with fever. If its feeling unsafe, it won’t come out to eat at its regular place. You can try coaxing it out or placing their feeding bowl near their safe place. If they still refuse to eat, change up their regular meal plan and introduce something exciting that they’d be more likely to consume.
  • Vomiting or diarrhea – Commonplace and serious cat illnesses cause fever. Additional symptoms like vomiting and diarrhea may also be present. If your cat is nifty, he/she may try to bury any signs of this. Check the area of their litter box. If you pet an outdoor cat, follow it outside to its resting area to search out any tell-tale signs.
  • Laziness – Now, cats are notoriously lazy creatures. But if your cat has been acting extra lethargic lately, you should consider taking him/her to a vet for a checkup. It is unusual for a cat who normally follows you around to not pay attention to you or treats that you may be dangling infront of him/her to get their attention.

If any of the above signs are present in your cat, you can proceed to check their body temperature with a thermometer. Lubricate this thermometer beforehand to make the process as comfortable as possible for your kitty. If the temperature reads above 103 degrees, rush your cat to a vet. They have a fever.