Choosing the right cat grooming scissors

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Pet groomers and pet stylists are frequently found to be frustrated with pet owners. The grudge is that the owners do not understand what they do and makes no effort to comprehend that theirs can be hard work. Scissors are an important part of the grooming process. They must be sharp. Owners have no idea about pet grooming and more often than not buys the cheapest scissors available on the market. These scissors are then sent to knife sharpener to get them sharp. These must be properly maintained like knives. Problems begin if they are not maintained as they should be.

Pet groomers like to work on clean animals. Dirty and matted pets are not first choices. A pet with a dirty coat will need extra effort to appear shiny. Scissors play a vital role in crafting the new appearance of any new pet. It is thus vital to buy a better quality of scissors. You should choose the scissor according to the job. Differences exist between shanks, shapes, and styles,

Basic scissor

The compulsory scissor is surely the wide blade one. These scissors make short work for larger quantities of hair, removing the strands extremely quickly. The wide blade makes this equipment strong. Blades have serration on a single side and both the edges are beveled. Micro-serration is present in one edge. These serrations grab the hair and hold the strands in place while the stylist cuts. This shear is for all dogs and is a must-have for every dog groomer.

If you give the basic scissors for sharpening, give it to someone who knows what is to be done. Offering the job to a lower quality craftsperson will end in removing the micro-serration. Ask the groomer as to whether they know anything about micro-serration. Micro-serration is much finer than the coarse serration. The hair must be held while being cut. The strands must not bend or slip while they are being cut.

Convex blades

There is a favorite among groomers. The scissors are extremely sharp and the cut is extremely smooth. One problem though: the sharp and fine edge is mostly temporary. The edges get extremely dull within a short period of time. The experience is equal to a razor blade. This is the reason convex blades are replaced frequently. The same premise holds true with the sharp and unserrated edge of convex shears. The shears should preferably be used on clean animals. Using them to cut dirty hairs will result in losing the sharp qualities extremely quickly. The same holds true for thinning shears, A beveled edge shear is needed for such cases. Use thinning shears to do about 80 percent of work and then move to convex edge one.