Finding the Sex of Your Kittens

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Determining the sex of your new kitten could be tricky. A lot of cat owners think they have a female cat only to find out later that their cat is male. It is essential to find out the sex of your kitten so that proper medicines can be given and the proper surgeries done (if any). To give an example, urinary tract problems are more observed in male cats.

Eight weeks or more

It is easier to find the sex of your cat if it is eight weeks old or older. The procedure, in this case, is a simple one. To find out, select a time when the kitten is at its most calm. A good time to do so is after a meal. You sit on a chair and lightly hold your cat in your lap. It is important to make the cat feel comfortable. When everything is calm and proper, lift the animal’s tail and take a good look at the rear end of the kitten. You should focus on two aspects: distance between genital opening and anus and the genital opening’s shape. You should know that the distance between the male penis opening and the anus is more when compared to the distance between the vulva and anus in females. The opening of the penis appears like a circle, and the vulva opening is like a line.

Do understand that the penis may not be visible in kittens. It is hard to locate, especially when they are incredibly young. The testicles are felt to be there within the scrotum. However, do note that they could be too little to identify or the kitten could be already neutered. In short, the absence of testicles does not mean that the cat is a female.

Younger kittens

It is much harder to identify younger kittens. Because the identifying structures are underdeveloped and tiny. It is a good thing that kittens at this young age stay together and you can find out the sex of the kitten by comparing sizes. You must not stress these kittens by taking them away from their mother. If you do have to take them away, you should not take them away for more than five minutes.

A few coat colors happen more in cats of a particular sex. Female cats have exclusively tortoiseshell colored coats. These appear like a blend of black and orange. The female will be calico as this takes the presence of all two X chromosomes. Only a rare male cat would have these coats. The orange tabby- a mix of white and orange- would mostly be a male cat- but a considerable number of female cats also have the same coat color.