Why do you think your dog is mad at you?

| 0 comments

Image credits – Pixabay

For most dog owners, keeping their companions happy is pretty high up on their list of priorities. A pet isn’t just a pet to many dog mummies and daddies. Pets are comparable to a human baby and as such it makes sense that we care a lot about how they feel, after all we have domesticated dogs for 30,000 years. We share much of our history with them. So when little Rover topples the trash bin or starts barking incessantly it’s only natural to be concerned. Is he really angry with you?

To put it bluntly, no he is not angry with you for not taking him out for his walk yesterday. According to the American Kennel Club dogs don’t experience anger like humans do. They don’t brood over a past incident and plan their revenge. So it doesn’t make sense to try and connect their destructive behavior to a past incident. Their erratic behavior should be seen as a response rather than an act of retribution.

Understand your dog’s perspective

If you and your dog lead a very sedentary lifestyle then there’s a pretty strong chance that your dog is just plain bored. Just imagine staying inside for a week with no contact with the outside world. For most people that would be pretty rough, and dogs are no exception.

If you do take your dog out for your morning runs and keep him or her busy, then acting out could be a symptom of a deeper problem. Some of the causes of aggression in dogs are-

  • Illnesses

Pain tends to bring out the worst in humans as well as dogs. Thyroid and brain tumors can make your little pooch aggressive. Dogs aren’t exempt from mental illnesses either. A veterinarian can correctly diagnose whether your dog has a physical or mental health issue.

  • Dominance

Dogs usually try to assert their dominance over other dogs, but sometimes this can happen towards humans as well. Dogs usually bite, snarl and snap when they feel challenged. Establish whether your dog’s aggression is illness-related first, because trying to correct its dominating behavior without doing so can make the matter worse.

  • Fear

Have you ever heard the phrase “A cornered animal is a dangerous animal”? When it comes to dogs, this phrase has to be taken literally. Fear can make a dog feel like it needs to defend itself if it’s unable to escape.

  • Psychological trauma

There are some memories we cannot forget no matter how much we try and the same applies to canines. When it comes to dogs, psychological trauma usually elicits immediate responses which little Rover may not be able to control.

It’s close to impossible to get an accurate answer from the internet because only you know the history and symptoms of your canine friend. The safest course of action would be to schedule a visit to your vet and then let him/her take it from there.